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After the death of the monarch of the United Kingdom, people in India rushed to Twitter. Kohinoor was trending on Twitter. The sentiments of Indian people are concerned with the Kohinoor diamond. They demanded the return of Kohinoor as it originally belonged to India. 

But India is not the only country who is demanding this diamond. Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan’s Taliban government from time to time also claimed the Kohinoor diamond. 

The British government rejected this demand as it was taken legally under the Treaty of Lahore. which was signed between the Britishers and Maharaja Dulip Singh of Punjab in 1849.

Who will get the Kohinoor after the death of the Queen?

Queen Elizabeth died when she was 96. She was the longest serving monarch of Britain. She ruled for almost 7 decades, that is 70 years. She was crowned in the year 1953. 

After the death of the Queen, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II, Charles II became the King and the Kohinoor diamond is at present with his wife Camilla Parker Bowl

At present it is on display in the Jewel House at the Tower of London.

Story Behind the Name Kohinoor given to the diamond 

The name Kohinoor was given by Nadir Shah. It is made up of two words, Koh-I-Noor 

In Persian language, “Koh means Mountain and Noor means light”. 

So, Kohinoor means the mountain of the light. 

Sometimes it is also written as Kūh-e Nūr, Koh-i-nūr. 

According to some historians, Kohinoor was first mentioned in a Sanskrit text in 4 BC. On the other hand, the majority of historians are of the view that it has been mined at Golconda mines from the time period of 1100 to 1300.

History of Kohinoor Diamond:

The Kohinoor diamond is transferred from dynasties to dynasties. Kohinoor was mined in the 12th century in Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh by the Kakatiya dynasty. 

Alauddin Khilji of the Delhi Sultanate sent his General Malik Kafur to conquer South India. At that time, Rudra Pratap Dev was the ruler of Warangal of the Kakatiya dynasty. 

Rudra Pratap Dev accepted his defeat. Malik Kafur took this diamond from him and gave it to Alauddin Khilji. 

In the first Battle of Panipat in 1526, Babur defeated Delhi Sultanate ruler Ibrahim Lodhi, and thus this diamond went into the hands of the Mughals. Babur, in his autobiography Baburnama, described Kohinoor as the diamond of Babur.

The grandson of Mughal emperor Akbar, Shah Jahan, embedded this diamond in the Peacock Throne. He in the 17th century commissioned the Peacock throne in Diwan-e-Aam at Red Fort. Kohinoor was mounted on this peacock throne.

Then Aurangzeb gave the responsibility of citing this diamond to Borgia, a gem artist, but unfortunately, he reduced its weight from 793 carats to 186 carats.

In 1739, Nadir Shah conquered Delhi and looted Mughal wealth. At that time, the Mughal Badshah was Mohammad Shah Rangeela. Nadir Shah took this diamond with him to Iran. 

Nadir Shah was killed by his own guard in 1747 in Iran. Ahmad Shah Abdali, his army general, established his own Durrani empire and got possession of the Kohinoor diamond.

During the reign of Shah Shuja, the Durrani empire was on the verge of fall, so he asked for the help of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. In return, Maharaja Ranjit Singh got the Kohinoor diamond. 

The Kohinoor diamond reached in the hands of royal family:

The Britishers fought 2 Anglo-Sikh wars to capture Punjab after the death of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1839. 

In 1849, the Britishers annexed Punjab and the Treaty of Lahore was signed between Maharaja Duleep Singh of Punjab, only 10 years old, and the Governor General of India, Lord Dalhousie. Under this treaty, Maharaja Duleep Singh would give the Kohinoor diamond to the Queen of England.

Then this diamond was secretly shipped to England and given to Queen Victoria. The husband of Queen Victoria, Prince Albert, reshaped the Kohinoor, which resulted in a further reduction of its weight to 105.6 carats. 

Then this diamond was shipped to England and was given to Queen Victoria. Then it was transferred to Queen Mary in 1911 and then to Queen Elizabeth in 1937 and finally to Queen Elizabeth II. 

Price of Kohinoor –

Babar, in his Autobiography, Tuzk-e-Babri or Baburnama, for the first time, mentioned this diamond. He said this diamond is worth half of the daily expenses of the whole world. 

However, it is estimated that its total value may be around $200 million. 

In 1851, this diamond was displayed at an exhibition in London. But people were not impressed with its beauty. So, on the orders of the Royal Family, it was cut into an oval shape. With cutting and polishing, its weight was reduced to 105 carats. 

Curses of Kohinoor Diamond –

There are many superstitions curses and bad luck associated with Kohinoor.

According to a Hindu text, anyone who possesses this diamond can conquer the whole world, but at the same time, he has to face some curses associated with it. Any dynasty that owned this diamond had a miserable fate.

It further stated that only women and God can wear it without any curse. It is said that 

He who owns this diamond will own 

The world but will also know all its 

Misfortunes only God or Woman 

Can wear it.

In the end, both Pakistan and India tried from time to time to get Kohinoor back, but the United Kingdom was reluctant to return it.

Who will get the Kohinoor after the death of the queen Elizabeth II?

After the death of the Queen, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II, Charles II became the King and the Kohinoor diamond is at present with his wife Camilla Parker Bowl.  At present it is on display in the Jewel House at the Tower of London.

Who gave Kohinoor diamond its name?

The name Kohinoor was given by Nadir Shah.

What is the price of a Kohinoor diamond?

Babar, in his Autobiography, Tuzk-e-Babri or Baburnama mentioned that this diamond is worth half of the daily expenses of the whole world. 
However, it is estimated that its total value may be around 20 billion US dollars that is 1.6 lakh crores in Indian rupees. 

When was the Kohinoor diamond mined?

Kohinoor was mined in the 12th century in Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh by the Kakatiya dynasty. 

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